Memphis Heritage Presents 'Then And Now" Memphis - Photographic Exhibit

Open to the Public Monday-Friday 8am-5pm

CANNON CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS AND

MEMPHIS HERITAGE PRESENT THEN-AND-NOW EXHIBIT OF

HISTORIC MEMPHIS PHOTOGRAPHS AND LANDMARKS

Memphis, TN (August 2, 2017) - The Cannon Center for the Performing Arts and Memphis Heritage, Inc. have come together to present “Newman’s Memphis”, a photographic exhibit of the well-known Memphis Photographer, Don Newman, and fellow Memphis photographer, Gary Walpole.

The exhibit features some of Newman’s iconic Downtown Memphis images taken in the 40’s and 50’s next to modern images of the same locations – a “then and now” look at Memphis Landmarks.  “We rotate exhibits at the Cannon Center regularly, but this one is special because it shows some of Newman’s most recognizable historical work next to an image of the Memphis we know today”, said Pierre Landaiche, Vice President and General Manager of the Cannon Center as well as the Memphis Cook Convention Center. “It’s a great Memphis history lesson.”


Don Newman's photos of Memphis taken in the 40's and 50's sit adjacent to modern photographs, revealing the City's changes over the years.

June Waddell West, Executive Director of Memphis Heritage, Inc. said “Gary has been a pleasure to work with and has a very dedicated approach to Don's work. Gary knew Don and has profound respect for what it took for Don to capture his distinctive images.  Gary took great pains to stand as close to where Don stood when taking his black and white photographs.”

“I was honored to participate in this project reflecting Memphis’ architectural history”, said Gary Walpole, who captured each “Now” photograph in the collection.  

Thirteen display cases along the Main Street concourse of the Cannon Center are filled with new and old images of Memphis, including the beautiful Warner Theater, built in 1921 but demolished in 1968.  A 1970 skyline view of Memphis is an adjacent contrast to Walpole’s 2006 version of the City.  Meanwhile, some of the modern photographs reveal surprising similarities to the original images; the Peabody Hotel has changed little in its almost 100-year history.  

Newman’s full collection can be viewed online at www.NewmansMemphis.org. Prints of Newman’s images can be purchased directly from the website or by calling MHI at 901-272-2727, with proceeds benefiting Memphis Heritage.  There is no charge for the exhibit which is open to the public during normal business hours.


24 photos of iconic Memphis Landmarks line the Main Street Concourse.